Mini Humanities 10

Is anything the same after it interacts?

Change, adversity and identity. 

Humanities 10 integrates the Social Studies and English (Literary Studies) curricula through an interdisciplinary approach. Throughout the year, the study of culture, geography and history is blended with various literary genres. Beyond building curricular connections between disciplines, this course is designed to promote critical thinking, creativity, and community building. It is my sincere hope that this class will provide a challenging learning experience and that your study of literature, media, history, philosophy, and geography will contribute to a rich, rewarding Grade 10 year. Students will attend Humanities for two blocks (back to back) and will receive a single mark.

Below is listed the specific curricular goals for this course; however, the course content, assignments and discussions will also be influenced by the ideas that students bring to this course. You are encouraged to bring your own connections, questions, and critiques to class so that we can continually work to make this course relevant to your lives.

BIG IDEAS/Learning Lenses

Global and regional conflicts have been a powerful force in shaping our contemporary and world identities.

The development of political institutions is influenced by economic, social, ideological and geographical factors.

Worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society.

Historical and contemporary injustices challenge the narrative and identity of Canada as an inclusive, multicultural society.

Language can shape ideas and influence others.

Texts are socially, culturally, historically constructed.

People understand text differently depending on world view and perspectives.

Learning Standards: Content

  • Various oral and written forms and genres
  • Literary elements and devices
  • Visual and digital literacies
  • Reading and writing strategies
  • Various presentation techniques
  • Social, political and economic systems

Time Period: 1918-Cold War

Learning Standards: Skills · Inquiry based learning: construction of inquiry questions; gather, interpret and evaluate various sources of information; communicate findings · Using research and evidence to make an argument · Formulating connections to self, text and society · Assess historical significance · Characterize time periods, and construct thematic connections · Assess causes and consequences in historical periods · Recognize various perspectives · Make ethical judgments

A Note on Course Content

In addition to looking at the twentieth century period, students will explore ideologies, civic politics and indigenous perspectives. Alongside this historical content, students will read poetry, short stories, and pieces of non-fiction. Field trips are planned for The Writers Festival, the Vancouver Art Gallery and Bard on the Beach.  In January, Cinematheque will come to our class for a three week workshop on documentary film making.

Session 1- January 15th- Visual Storytelling/Camera Tech (Full Morning)
Session 2- January 17th– Pre Production Prep (Research, pitches, preparation)  (Full Afternoon)
Session 3- January 21st– Final Pre Production Preparation- (Create Production Schedule) (Full Afternoon)
Session 4- January 23rd- Filming Day 1/3 (Full Afternoon)
Session 5- January 29th- Filming Day 2/3 (Full Afternoon)
Session 6- January 31st- Filming Day  3/3 (Full Afternoon)
Session 7- February 4th- Editing Day 1/5 (Full Morning)
Session 8- February 6th- Editing Day 2/5 (Full Morning)
Session 9- February 20th Editing Day 3/5 (Full Afternoon)
Session 10- February 22nd- Editing Day 4/5 (Full Morning)
Session 11- February 26th- FINAL Editing Day 5/5 (Full Afternoon)
FINAL SCREENING- March 4th (Afternoon)

Methods of Assessment: Observation, Conferencing and Portfolio which will include reflection and feedback on projects, presentations, and assignments.  Different tasks will be assigned for students to show their understanding.

Rubrics will be given in advance of assessing. Term end self-evaluations will occur three times a year.

Central to this course are the core competencies – thinking, communication and social/personal awareness. The course follows an inquiry framework, with students investigating Big Ideas through guiding questions. Students will each choose an area to research and investigate in depth. They will learn through their own research and through sharing their knowledge with their peers, formally and informally.

Classroom Expectations

Students must use respectful language and conduct.

Students will cooperate and listen when peer lead discussions, presentations, and group activities are a part of a lesson.

Students must be prepared with appropriate materials for each class: texts, binders, paper, pencils, ruler, eraser and school agenda.

Students are expected to use their Office 365 accounts (handouts are made available in our classroom folder, and some assignments will be electronically submitted on my blog).

Students who are absent from class must complete an absence report form· Students are responsible for making up work missed during their absence.

Students who are absent on the day of a test, must have their parents phone/e-mail me to explain the reason for the absence and to arrange a time to re-write.

Students must adhere to the policies of academic honesty outlined in the PW Agenda.

How can students be successful in this course?

Using a variety of learning strategies
Understanding learning goals and identifying target areas for growth
Being curious and engaged
Managing time efficiently and effectively
Openly exploring personal identity and values
Detecting bias – including one’s own
Conducting rigorous Research – including reliable sources and citations

Mini Humanities 9

What does it mean to bring about change? What implications are felt?

Legacy, Identity, Emerging Ideas.

This course focuses on the years 1500-1815 (major events in Europe and North America).

  • political, social, economic and technological revolutions and their impacts
  • the continuing effects of imperialism and colonialism on indigenous peoples around the world
  • global demographic shifts including patterns of migration and population growth
  • nationalism and the development of modern nation states
  • local, regional and global conflicts
  • the relationship between social values and technologies and various forms of artistic expression

Course Organization: This course combines English 9 and Social Studies 9.  The topics we study in Social Studies will be the primary motor running the Humanities 9 course.  It is my hope that students learn more about themselves, each other and the world around them while studying the themes and topics in Humanities 9.  Critical thinking skills are used to understand how Canada (and the world) has been influenced by ideas, the environment, power and emerging identities.  Current Events will be a part of our year, too.

Colonialism and Conflict:  How did early European colonization influence the development of Canada?

Democracy and the Modern World:  How did the revolutions in England, America, and France lead to modern democracy?

Global Transformations: What brought about change in Europe and North America?

(Depth, not breadth, will be our guiding principle throughout the year)

Age of Invention & Revolution: Industrial, French, Russian, American, Civil War
Cultures, Conflict and Colonization in British North America
The Fall of New France and Trade Wars

Building a Nation (Confederation)

The British North American Colonies Evolve and Becoming a Country (The Book of Negroes?)

Canada and The Great War

The War to End War – to 1919 (Modern Poetry & A Testament of Youth)

BIG IDEAS

Emerging ideas and ideologies profoundly influence societies and events.

The physical environment influences the nature of political, social and economic change.

Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.

Collective identity is constructed over time and can change over time.

Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.

Texts are socially, historically and culturally constructed.

Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and the world.

People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and perspectives.

Questioning what we hear, read and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.

Sample Guiding Questions:

  • Why did Europe undergo significant social, political and technological change in the 18th through 19th centuries?
  • How did Europe’s changes during the 18th through 19th centuries impact the rest of the world?
  • How did Europe’s relationship with global colonies impact European arts, cultures, economies, social structures and technologies?
  • How does the physical environment influence the nature of political, social and cultural development?
  • How do our collective values shape our cultural identities and goals?
  • Why did some cultures develop large populations, social hierarchies and relatively complex political and technological systems, while others remained relatively small, stable and materialistically simple?
  • What criteria might we use to assess the well-being and “success” of a particular culture or society?

How can students be successful in this course?

  1. Using a variety of learning strategies – body and mind, verbal and visual
  2. Understanding learning goals and identifying target areas for growth
  3. Being curious and engaged
  4. Managing time efficiently and effectively
  5. Openly exploring personal identity and values
  6. Detecting bias – including one’s own
  7. Conducting rigorous Research – including reliable sources and citations

Classroom Expectations

  • Students must use respectful language and conduct.
  • Students will cooperate and listen when peer lead discussions, presentations, and group activities are a part of a lesson.
  • Students must be prepared with appropriate materials for each class: texts, binders, paper, pencils, ruler, eraser and school agenda.
  • Students are expected to use their Office 365 accounts (handouts are made available in our classroom folder, and some assignments will be electronically submitted).
  • Students who are absent from class must complete an absence report form· Students are responsible for making up work missed during their absence.
  • Students who are absent on the day of a test, must have their parents phone/e-mail me to explain the reason for the absence and to arrange a time to re-write.
  • Students must adhere to the policies of academic honesty outlined in the PW Agenda.

Methods of Assessment: Observation, Conferencing and Portfolio which will include reflection and feedback on projects, presentations, and assignments.  Rubrics will be given in advance of assessing.

Central to this course are the core competencies – thinking, communication and social/personal awareness. The course follows an inquiry framework, with students investigating Big Ideas through guiding questions. Students will each choose an area to research and investigate in depth. They will learn through their own research and through sharing their knowledge with their peers, formally and informally.

Essential Questions for the year:  Why Canada? Why do people move?  What makes a nation? What are the impacts of conflict on a group of people? 

Bard in the Classroom – January/February.  January 21, 23, 29, 31.  February 1, 4, 20, 22, 26, 28  TO BE CONFIRMED.

Literary Studies and Composition 10

What does language and context mean?

Change, Identity, Perspective

https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/english-language-arts/10/literary-studies

English Language Arts – Big Ideas
• Text and story deepen understanding of complex and abstract ideas
• The exploration of text and story deepens understanding of one’s
identity, others, and the world
• People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and
perspectives
• Texts are socially, culturally, geographically, and historically constructed
• Language shapes ideas and influences others

Suggested texts/activities:

“Growing Up Native”
“My Other Self”
“Shooting an Elephant”
Narrative
Descriptive writing
Voice
Identity
Memoir
Political and social justice writing
Expository Essay
“Why I want a Wife”
Privileged backpack
“Thank you for not killing my son”
Newspaper / journalism
Integrating quotations
“Mama, the dentist, and me”
Audience
Research paper
Dave Eggers
Guest authors/Writers Festival

Central to this course are the core competencies – thinking, communication and social/personal awareness. The course follows an inquiry framework, with students investigating Big Ideas through guiding questions. Students will each choose an area to research and investigate in depth. They will learn through their own research and through sharing their knowledge with their peers, formally and informally.

Methods of Assessment: Observation, Conferencing and Portfolio which will include reflection and feedback on projects, presentations, and assignments.  Rubrics will be given in advance of assessing.

 

How can students be successful in this course?

Using a variety of learning strategies – body and mind, verbal and visual
Understanding learning goals and identifying target areas for growth
Being curious and engaged
Managing time efficiently and effectively
Openly exploring personal identity and values
Detecting bias – including one’s own
Conducting rigorous Research – including reliable sources and citations
Classroom Expectations
Students must use respectful language and conduct.
Students will cooperate and listen when peer lead discussions, presentations, and group activities are a part of a lesson.
Students must be prepared with appropriate materials for each class: texts, binders, paper, pencils, ruler, eraser and school agenda.
Students are expected to use their Office 365 accounts (handouts are made available in our classroom folder, and some assignments will be electronically submitted).
Students who are absent from class must complete an absence report form· Students are responsible for making up work missed during their absence.
Students who are absent on the day of a test, must have their parents phone/e-mail me to explain the reason for the absence and to arrange a time to re-write.
Students must adhere to the policies of academic honesty outlined in the PW Agenda.